How much would you sell a dressage horse for?

December 28, 2008 by  
Filed under Horse Buying

Ethan R asked:

My mother recently sold my dressage horse partner of 5 years. He was a Belgian Warmblood gelding trained to third level and ready to move to fourth. His father was Fraval, a very prominent sire. He was 17.1 and was a beautiful mover, top level quality for sure!! Years of professional training and was 9 years old. TOP LEVEL PROSPECT!

What should I look for in a Dressage horse when purchasing?

December 26, 2008 by  
Filed under Horse Buying

Emily J asked:

Hey, so I am goingto start Dressage, I do not plan on buying a horse right away, but in a few years I am. Once I do get more experince. What things should I look for in them?

Buying Your New (first) Horse

November 5, 2008 by  
Filed under Horse Buying

Buying your first or new horse can be a very exciting but nervous time. Will I find what I’m after? Will it be the right horse for me? What is the real reason it’s for sale? Does it have any health problems? HELP…… I don’t want to be ripped off!

RELAX………..here are a few handy hints that can reduce the stress in choosing your new equine partner.

Whether you are looking at buying your first horse or your 3rdor 4th there are a few safe guards you can take to help ensure it is an exciting time in both your lives.

So you have decided to buy a horse, congratulations! Now that you have taken this first step there are a few things you need to decide.

What are your plans with your new horse? Do you just want to go trail riding? Do you want to compete? If so, in what equestrian sport? Western, Dressage, Jumping, Polo, Pony Club, Eventing, Rodeo, Show riding, breed classes???

Do you have a breed preference? What height horse is best suited to you? What sex animal do you prefer? Will it be run with other horses? Are you experienced enough for a young horse? How much are you willing to spend?

Sometimes it can be difficult to pin point exactly what type of horse is best suited to you and your equestrian pursuits. It is advisable to seek out the opinion of a more experienced horse person, someone you trust and has lots of horse knowledge.

Unless you are buying for a particular breed or show ring activity, the coat color is of no importance! I have seen lots of people make mistakes having brought a horse because of their coat color.

I personally have never been a big fan of grays (sorry to all the gray lovers out there), but I will tell you that some of my best horses have infact been gray!

There are quite a few different horse buying guides and sources around. Check out the internet, local paper and local saddlery shop. Don’t forget to ask your friends and horse acquaintances. These people will normally know who is for sale, why they are for sale and what the horse is like.

So you have found a horse that sounds great on paper and have contacted the owner to organize a viewing time. See if you can have a knowledgeable horse person go with you.

Try to arrive a little earlier than the agreed time. This way you will see if the horse has been worked before you get there and hopefully allows you to see the horse being caught and tacked up.

Get the owner to show you the horse being ridden first, and then get your friend to have a try and see what they think. If the horse doesn’t seem to be suitable at this point or it scares you half to death, then don’t get on!!! If you don’t feel comfortable now then you won’t when you get it home.

Ask lots of questions. Even if you think they are silly. You won’t know unless you ask. View any registration papers and competition results.

Have a good look at the horse, pick up all four feet, look in their mouth, under their tail, in their eyes and note anything that looks abnormal. If you don’t know what you are looking at get your friend to look.

If after you have put it through its paces and you think it maybe the right horse for you then I suggest two things, it maybe an idea to put a deposit down (if the owner agrees) and get a vet check done.

A vet will view the horse and conduct a few tests to see if it is healthy and sound. Remember to get an independent vet, one that hasn’t seen the horse before.

It may also be wise to have another viewing of the horse on a different day. Even if you arrived unannounced, at least this gives you an idea of what the horse is like naturally.

Talk to people who may have seen the horse before, they should be able to tell you anything that they have noticed.

See the horse loaded on to a trailer, lead the horse around yourself, try putting the bridle on, any think else you may have to do on a regular bases.

Once you have done all this and you still think the horse is suitable then it maybe necessary to negotiate the price. This is entirely up to you.

But remember that a lot of owners won’t budge on the price, especially if they know it’s a good horse (Although I have picked up a couple of great horses for half price their value, having been in the right place at the right time).

Remember to have all the registration forms transferred over to your name (or at least signed over) before you take the horse home. Also get a receipt saying you have paid for the horse in full before you leave the property.

Congratulations!!! You are now the proud owner of your new horse. May it be a long and satisfying journey together.

Happy Horsing

Tina Williamson B App Sci (Equine)

How to Select Horses, Riding Stables Trailers and Trainers

November 3, 2008 by  
Filed under Horse Buying

To select horses for a breeding program you should make your selection based first on disposition, conformation and athletic ability, pedigree, compatability of color with our strain.

If you find a horse that possesses all of these qualities and it happens to be homozygous, (possessing two identical forms (alleles) of a particular gene, one inherited from each parent, for breeding true that’s great, if not, you may try to cross it with one that is. Others, select horses for their ruggedness; excellent feet, leg, and bone; confirmation; temperament; intelligence and cowiness, as do all good foundation breeders.

So, what sets the best horses apart? We suggest that you select horses with extended elastic strides and good suspension in addition to large, hard, round, mostly black or striped hooves, but you will need to work out your own requirements.

Choosing a horse for a jumping breeding candidate will clearly have different qualifications than one chosen for, for example, flat racing. Just because a horse has a wall full of show awards does not mean he’ll be the best choice for backpacking into the wilderness on an elk hunt. You have to really think through the characteristics you seek to develop and don’t lose hold of those requirements when selecting which you will breed from.

Selecting a Horse to Buy

When looking at a horse for sale’ ads, remember that the right personality is a number one requirement. But, the horses personality is either mentioned near the last, or not at all! Imagine choosing your human mate this way a Oh, yes that must be a good one: good looking, well bred, very highly skilled in his/her field.

However do be very careful when buying a horse buying an unsuitable horse and thinking it will be easy to fix, is usually a bad idea. In our experience nothing could be farther from the truth.

How to select a Horse at a Riding stables

When selecting a horse at a riding centre it is suggested that it is best to choose one where you can select a horse from a well trained herd, of 60 heads or more. For novices, be sure that they can accommodate beginners to experts. the best stables pride themselves on safety and the emphasis is placed on proper riding.

Selecting a Horse Trailer

Selecting a horse trailer is one of the most important decisions a horse owner can make. Because it’s very easy to be overwhelmed by fancy options and shiny construction materials, it is extremely important to keep in mind that the number one priority when shopping for a trailer is safety.

Selecting a Horse Trainer

The trainer should be able to unlock the full potentials of the horse. Training should not be brutal, or hard on the horse.

Remember, when hiring a horse trainer, you should always look for the best candidate available. However, don’t assume that overall care for the horse is guaranteed by the trainer. Remember that when you get the horse home it may take a while to settle in so don’t panic if you encounter some settling in problems simply take things slowly and work them through. Remember that the horse trainer needs a happy and content horse to work with if he or she is to get the best from your steed.

We simply cannot emphasise too highly that to learn natural horsemanship is by far the best. As are far as we are concerned it literally works wonders!

Horse Classifieds Great For Horse Buying Research

October 31, 2008 by  
Filed under Horse Buying

Buying a horse can be a very time consuming endeavor, with all the different horse breeds and skills to choose from. The more you become familiar with the process of buying and selling horses, the better your chances will be to end up with the horse to fit your needs. There are many avenues to look for the horse you want, like a local barn, tack shops, newspaper classifieds, and now you can go online and look through thousands of horse for sale classifieds. Take your time and don’t get to overwhelmed. If you make the selection process in a hurry, you might make an unwise purchase. Plan to take from one month to one year to find your ideal horse. Understandably, if you are without a horse, one year mite sound like a very long time, but you can use this time to become more knowledgeable about what you want by taking lessons.

The first thing you must determine is what you really want from a horse, and to what extent you will be using him/her. Will the horse be a trustworthy companion or wonderful Dressage prospect? Buy taking the time and comparing the different classified ads presented to you, will help determine your priorities. Be sure to use the advanced search features each online classified horse website has to offer, this will help you to narrow down your search results.

Once you have found the horse you want, its always a good idea to get a professional opinion when you are buying a horse. Whether or not you use an agent to help you select your horse, you should always have a basic veterinary pre-purchase exam performed. When you seek out professional advice, pay for it and then listen to it! When your instructor or veterinarian cautions you about a horse, it is for a reason. When seeking advice, it is best to a well-respected professional that has no vested interest in the horse sale.

Here is a breakdown of what to look for when a horse is for sale:

* does the horse fit your needs
* what skills does the horse possess
* does the horse have a good temperament
* do comparisons of other similar horses
* does the horse fit the selling price
* get professional advice
* are there any lessons with the sale
* make sure to have pre-purchase vet exam
* can you afford the upkeep on a horse (such as boarding, feed, and veterinary care.)

Stay focused. Keep in mind that you are selecting a horse for a particular reason or desired skill. There are many decisions and compromises lying ahead, so it helps if you set your priorities clearly at the outset.

If the overall purpose of the horse is to teach you how to ride rather than to carry you to the winner’s circle, then the selection process will emphasize different traits to fit your needs. If the horse is intended to be a long-term project rather than a stepping stone, you may need to invest more time, effort, and money in your purchase. Remember to take your time and use the tools at your disposal, such as online horse classifieds, you will thank yourself in the end.

Do These 8 Tests Before You Buy The Horse

October 30, 2008 by  
Filed under Horse Buying

Buying a horse is actually the simple procedure of exchanging dollars and cents for an animal of your choice. But buying an animal suited to your abilities is a difficult task. Before looking for a horse decide what use and purpose the horse will serve, for pleasure, for breeding, or for showing. Each of these is in a different category and requires a different kind of animal. However, you may be fortunate enough to find a combination of all three attributes.
Consider these tests before you buy a horse:
1. Look at him from a distance and examine his build as a whole. This is called conformation, and each breed of horse has certain characteristics that identify him by form. The animal should carry his head well and be neatly put together.
2. Check for soundness. Run your hands up and down his legs. Look for an unexplained lump or sign of soreness.
3. Test his vision. A horse should blink when you wave your hand in back of his eye.
4. See whether or not he leads in or out of the stable easily.
5. Watch saddling and bridling. See if he is uneasy when cinched. Some horses are afraid of a girth, caused by too tight a cinch. Notice whether or not he is bridle shy, touchy about the ears; whether he opens his mouth to receive the bit.
6. Have the owner ride the animal so you can see how he handles. Watch whether he stops easily, reins well, backs, and has an easy gait. Have the owner work the horse to a gallop. Try to determine if he is speed crazy. The owner should guarantee the safety of the animal as to training. Also, note whether or not there is excessive breathing, noise with the breathing, and flanks that heave spasmodically.
7. Most important! Ride the horse yourself. Is he smooth in the walk, trot, and canter? Does he shy? Is he spooky? Can you start and stop him? Is he too spirited for you to handle? Does he switch his tail constantly? Can you ride him away from the stable? A tail-switcher means that the animal has been pushed too fast in training and indicates nervousness. Usually a horse that has been trained by a woman will not like a man rider, or will be uneasy with a man on his back. Sometimes this works in the reverse. Many times it is because of the handling of the reins. A man is normally heavier handed than a woman. However, this depends on the horse and the rider in the main, but it is something to consider in buying a horse that has been privately owned by one person for some time.
8. Don’t buy a stallion. He may look good in the movies but is not practicable in real life. He is likely to be unpredictable and should be managed only by an expert horseman. He belongs, mainly, on the breeding farm. You’ll find just as much spirit and animation in a good mare or gelding and far less trouble.
No horse is perfect, but whatever faults are present you must decide whether or not they may be eliminated with some training. Many times all a horse needs is work. Horses also respond to owners. They have their likes and dislikes. Personalities clash just as between people. Whole personalities have changed with ownership.
Be sure the animal is suited to your own capabilities. And, once again, don’t buy the first horse you see. Some­where there is a horse suited to you. Two things are important: the age of the rider and of the horse, and the experience or lack of it in both rider and animal.
One must equal the other, rider and animal, because no matter how well trained the horse, if the rider does not understand this training, then the horse will not work well. And a good horse can soon be ruined by a poor rider.

Buying a Horse

October 29, 2008 by  
Filed under Horse Buying

Having a horse is a major responsibility which should not be taken lightly. When deciding to buy a horse there are many factors to consider. It is a good idea to talk to current horse owners about their experiences, and even take riding lessons so you are more experienced with basic horse husbandry.

There are many places you can buy a horse from. These can include auctions and private owners. No matter where you buy your horse from it is important you get a thorough history from the owner, as well having a pre-purchase exam done by a veterinarian. Doing these two things can save you a lot of money and stress.

When choosing the type of horse to buy, there are over 350 different breeds of horses to consider. But the main thing to look for is the temperament of the horse. If this is your first horse you should choose a horse that is calm. It would also be best to buy a horse that is already trained.

The age of the horse is probably not as important as the temperament. But the age is an important factor to consider. Horses can live up to 30 years. Choosing a horse that has had several years of training is probably the most important factor.

Once you have purchased your horse you have to decide on where to board your horse. If you are lucky, you have a farm to keep the horse at. But a lot of people will have to keep the horse at a boarding stable which can be costly.

Another consideration you need to think about before buying a horse is how much time do you have to devote to the horse. Horses need to be fed twice a day, stalls need to be cleaned, and training needs to be done. Having a horse, or any pet is a major time commitment. Please give this serious thought before buying any pet.

Money is a big factor in deciding to buy a horse. There are many costs that people may not think about before buying a horse. Boarding fees, stable fees, feed, and tackle can add up to a big bill. Also, do not forget that if your horse gets sick you need to pay a large veterinarian bill as well.

These are just some of the considerations you need to think about before buying a horse. By doing research before you purchase a horse you can save yourself a lot of time and money.


The Fear of Honesty – Pitfalls in Selling Horses

October 27, 2008 by  
Filed under Horse Buying

When trying to sell a horse, it can be terribly difficult to know what to say to potential clients. Sellers are terrified of saying the wrong thing and scaring off a buyer before they even see the horse. Because of this, horse selling has become a tangled web of truths and untruths.

You hear it all the time: buyers bemoaning the lack of honest sellers. They go to look at a horse advertised as 16.2hh only to discover that the horse is only 15.3hh. They try a horse that is supposed to be well trained over fences only to discover that the horse stops at anything bigger than a cross-rail. How can any buyer trust a horse seller if this is what they encounter?

On the other hand, how many buyers turn away as soon as they hear that a horse is only 16hh? They refuse to look at anything advertised as less than 16.2hh because they know that everything will in fact be around 16hh – which is just what they are looking for. And yet, the honest seller who has measured his horse is penalized by the buyers who won’t even go see the horse.

As you look around at message boards or horsy joke sites you see lists of cliché statements that sellers make and what they “really” mean. Statements like “needs an experienced rider” are taken to mean that the horse is a maniac, or “free jumps over 4′” means that the horse is an escape artist and jumps out if his paddock. So, what can you say that will not be taken as exaggeration, or even as fiction?

It has come to the point where sellers have no idea what to say. On top of this there is the difficulty of pricing a horse. If a horse is well trained, easy to ride and otherwise a great animal, how do you price it? If you price it too low, everyone wonders what is wrong with it that you are not telling them. If you price it too high, buyers compare it to horses selling at half the price with the same claims to fame. Strangely enough, the same price can have totally opposite reactions from different buyers, one feeling it is far too little, and the other feeling it is far too much.

Buyers feel that the honest horse seller no longer exists. The seller feels that it doesn’t matter what he says – no one will believe him. How can these two ends meet?

There isn’t an easy solution. Ideally a seller should be honest about his horse, telling potential buyers the truth about the size, type, training, personality and even vices that a horse may have. Buyers should take this at face value and be willing to look at a horse even if it might fall slightly short of what they are looking for.

Far too many buyers ignore perfectly good animals that are honestly presented by their owners only to go out and spend thousands of dollars buying a horse that turns out to have serious issues. Add to this the escalated prices demanded by coaches and trainers on the take, and neither the buyer nor the seller have a fair shake at things.

Buying a horse isn’t easy, and neither is selling one. With buyers complaining of not being able to find a good horse, and sellers complaining of not having a market, somehow both ends need to meet. What can we do to fix this critical fault in the system? How can we make horse buying and selling honest?

Online Horse Classifieds Great for Horse Buying Research

October 25, 2008 by  
Filed under Horse Buying

Buying a horse can be a very time consuming endeavor, with all the different horse breeds and skills to choose from. The more you become familiar with the process of buying and selling horses, the better your chances will be to end up with the horse to fit your needs. There are many avenues to look for the horse you want, like a local barn, tack shops, newspaper classifieds, and now you can go online and look through thousands of horse for sale classifieds. Take your time and don’t get to overwhelmed. If you make the selection process in a hurry, you might make an unwise purchase. Plan to take from one month to one year to find your ideal horse. Understandably, if you are without a horse, one year mite sound like a very long time, but you can use this time to become more knowledgeable about what you want by taking lessons.

The first thing you must determine is what you really want from a horse, and to what extent you will be using him/her. Will the horse be a trustworthy companion or wonderful Dressage prospect? Buy taking the time and comparing the different classified ads presented to you, will help determine your priorities. Be sure to use the advanced search features each online classified horse website has to offer, this will help you to narrow down your search results.

Once you have found the horse you want, its always a good idea to get a professional opinion when you are buying a horse. Whether or not you use an agent to help you select your horse, you should always have a basic veterinary pre-purchase exam performed. When you seek out professional advice, pay for it and then listen to it! When your instructor or veterinarian cautions you about a horse, it is for a reason. When seeking advice, it is best to a well-respected professional that has no vested interest in the horse sale.

Here is a breakdown of what to look for when a horse is for sale:

* does the horse fit your needs
* what skills does the horse possess
* does the horse have a good temperament
* do comparisons of other similar horses
* does the horse fit the selling price
* get professional advice
* are there any lessons with the sale
* make sure to have pre-purchase vet exam
* can you afford the upkeep on a horse (such as boarding, feed, and veterinary care.)

Stay focused. Keep in mind that you are selecting a horse for a particular reason or desired skill. There are many decisions and compromises lying ahead, so it helps if you set your priorities clearly at the outset.

If the overall purpose of the horse is to teach you how to ride rather than to carry you to the winner’s circle, then the selection process will emphasize different traits to fit your needs. If the horse is intended to be a long-term project rather than a stepping stone, you may need to invest more time, effort, and money in your purchase. Remember to take your time and use the tools at your disposal, such as online horse classifieds, you will thank yourself in the end.

Thinking of Buying a Horse?

October 23, 2008 by  
Filed under Horse Buying

There is so much excitement and anticipation in the very art of buying a horse. It is certainly a task not to be taken lightly. A horse is certainly not as easy to drop off at your local shelter as a cat is. When you buy a horse it should be genuine, not a spur of the moment whim.

The biggest consideration when buying a horse is where to keep him. Investigating local stables and yards, finding out the fee and what you are paying for is an important step to make the transition easier. I have yet to find a stable that pays for horse shoeing, unless it is on their horses!

Once you’ve settled on a place to keep your horse, you can then indulge yourself in finding a good horse. Horses are easy enough to come by, but not all horses are alike. We know that all horses bite, it is a fact horse owners rarely think about. However when buying a horse it is a tidbit to keep handy.

Some horses due to cruel handling, neglect or an aggressive streak will bite. Biting is a bad habit called a vice, horses that bite do not make a good first horse purchase. There is fact in the saying “once bitten twice shy”!

Read up on vices so you know one when you see one and if the current owner says the horse crib bites, you’ll know what that means and whether it is a vice you can live with. Remember the horse is yours and will be your responsibility once you purchase it.

Like humans you have horses in good health and others in questionable health. Some owners will try to sell a horse when they find out his health is less than perfect. The horse could have been in a field and cut his leg. Seems like an every day possibility but depending on where and how severe the cut, he could have done permanent damage. He would thus have a weakness and be prone to lameness.

It is always a good idea to have a veterinarian inspect the horse you want to purchase. That way any possibility of ill health can be brought to your attention and you are in control of taking on the responsibility or not.

Find out if people know about the horse and let them tell you their view of the horse. What is he like on an every day basis when a prospective buyer is not looking? Some horses are lunged to tire them out before a buyer comes to ride…

Yes, riding is sure a very important step when buying a horse! I was so desperate to buy my first horse that I overlooked this step and regretted it every day of the two years I owned the horse. Sometimes you can simply get sold by the look of a horse…

Make sure you buy a good horse that is right for you. The best way to do that is to read and gain knowledge of horses. Take a trainer or experienced horse person with you, but be sure to trust your instinct and have the knowledge to make the best decision for you. Turns out the person I took with me to buy my first horse was really looking for something they wanted.

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